Five Reasons People Leave Therapy Prematurely
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Five Reasons People Leave Therapy Prematurely
After many years of therapy and in a much lower field, my friend asked her therapist if she thought she would look for antidepressants. "I would recommend it if I think you are in crisis," he said as part of his answer. This sentence jumped and hurt him. He felt completely invisible. Didn't he see the pain he felt? Did he think he was doing something big on the left? Lulka, he believed he was leaving therapy. She was angry with her therapist and clearly felt that she did not understand him. In addition, he has been running for some time and his problems are still unresolved! After all, he took a lot of money. So what's the point? To my depression compassion, we began to talk about the many steps he could take that would lead to a different conclusion. It's an unexpected but strong rule that every time the urge to cancel comes and it never comes back, it's a time when you can use therapy. The best answer to this urge is to talk about it in the same office you are trying to get to. Although people leave therapy without time for many different reasons, the most common can be addressed in the following ways: 1. "My therapist kicked me." Therapists are not powerful at all; they are people. And like everyone else, they make mistakes. Sometimes they also don't understand you, forget something important to you or just see the problem from a different perspective. And they do all this in a deep personal relationship with you. So if you've been in therapy for a while, it's almost a guarantee that you'll be angry with your therapist at some point. No matter how you feel, that moment is actually a lot of time. Most of us have some difficulty confronting each other in life. Maybe they'll take us and call us, or maybe we'll pack up and get dressed. Whatever we do may not be what we consider "ideal". If you are angry with your therapist, you can try different behaviors and express your anger on a petri dish on the therapy table. If the therapist is worth it, he will listen to you and help you process what is happening to you so that you can act in anger. He won't try to talk you out, he won't cry like your mother or he will be as angry with you as your father. It may be a different experience than usual and therefore satisfying. He or she will listen to how you feel and see how it generally informs you about your therapeutic work. He can even use it to better understand you. The result will bring you two closer and your next sessions will be more productive. 2. "I can't take it anymore." As our finances deteriorate, the first answer is change by eliminating "unnecessary" ones, such as gym membership, lack of food and, unfortunately, therapy. However, when you are at the bottom or your business is experiencing problems, you may experience increased levels of stress and anxiety, decreased feelings of self-worth, shame, and even despair. In difficult times like these, you can especially benefit from the continued support of a caring therapist. So what to do if it's too expensive? Try to explain the situation to your therapist and see if they adjust the fee. Most therapists work on a floating scale, which means that they move their salary up and down within the window based on what their clients can pay. The reason for this practice is that the frequency and nature of therapeutic treatment should be based on what is in the client's best interests, not on what he has in his wallet. Tell your therapist what you can get, and you two will probably be able to negotiate a one-time fee. 3. "I don't think it's anywhere." I have heard many variations at social events over the years: “I never knew what I was doing in therapy. I'm not sure it works. If you have not made it clear to yourself or your therapist what you want to do, your therapy may be stopped. Your therapeutic goals and strategies. Achieve these goals. You can also log in / out with your therapist. This will require you to say what you want to do at the time of day during the first five minutes of the session. Then, in the last five minutes, you evaluate this intention and check whether it has been fulfilled, resp. No. If so, how? If not, why not? But sometimes a different situation arises. The urge to leave can strike just because you are about to finish a serious job. Rejection of certain feelings is a healthy coping mechanism that protects you from problems that are too painful to look at when you are not ready. Is it possible that there is a painful consciousness around it? When you talk about the possibilities of this unpleasant desire to get away, your therapist can help you set comfortable boundaries and speed up your work in small steps so that you can feel safe again. This way, you can stay longer and deal with important, albeit frightening, problems that you have avoided. 4. "Maybe I just wasn't ready for therapy." At the beginning of therapy, people often find that it is not "appropriate". Discrepancies occur in therapy as often as in dating, and often involve the irrelevant - the atmosphere between the two. It is also possible that you will occasionally come across the office of someone who is not a very good therapist. The key at this point is not to discontinue therapy, but máy nén khí to make some comparisons. Try to get some personal references or read as much as possible about each therapist. Many therapists offer free introductory consultations, both over the phone and in person. Try at least three and then choose your favorite. Remember that you are a customer of this business relationship. You choose the person with whom you share the most intimate details about yourself, so it is important that you are at ease with him. It's okay to choose.

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